Gres House in a Brazilian Rain Forest by Luciano Kruk

Gres House in Brazil by Luciano Kruk

Set within dense Brazilian rainforest, Gres House serves to blur the distinctions between outside and in, while keeping trees, bugs and other nasties affirmably on the other side of the glass. The dwelling makes extensive use of floor-to-ceiling windows, which comprise virtually all of the external walls, and an overtly angular floor plan to maximise the views out onto the surrounding forest.

Main Bedroom of Gres House with 3 Walls of Floor to Ceiling Windows

Side View of Gres House by Luciano Kruk in Brazilian Forest

Gres House was designed by Luciano Kruk, who once comprised BAK Arquitectos along with Besonías Almeida. In the past we featured Pedroso House by BAK Architects and a lot of the idiosyncrasies of the former architectural office are evident in Luciano Kruk’s recent projects.

Living Area of Gres House with Floor to Ceiling Windows

Twin Bedroom of Gres House with Full Wall Window Looking Out onto Brazilian Forest

Angular Walls and Corners to Make Trees Appear Inside

The unusually shaped rooms might seem to bottle-neck the flow of space, but these narrowings actually serve to create an illusion of the outside and inside becoming one. For example if you were to cast a glance from the corridor to the kitchen, you would see a cluster of trees in between while the interior space remains sealed.

Courtyard Section of Gres House to Create Illusion of Forest Inside

Bathroom of Gres House with View of Forest

Gres House at Sunset

But Luciano Kruk has continued this outside-inside motif – and taken it a step further – by even including boulders within corridors and rooms. While certainly being an unusual form of ornamentation, these large rocks help break up the space and also by the looks of it serve as pretty neat stools.

The use of extended wings and courtyards in the floor plan also helps to keep work and living spaces separate. There’s a clear distinction between this desk area and the living space opposite, which to get to you’ll have to either take a step outside or go the long way round.

Enclosed Desk Area of Gres House by Luciano Kruk

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Comments

  1. Amy Nash

    God…this is just amazing. This is literally my dream home. Out in the forest, all glass walls, this is just ridiculously awesome, I am out of words!

  2. jeremy

    so this is what the theyre putting in after they cut down the brazilian rainforests: overpriced art houses.

    1. Homeli Author
      Homeli

      No doubt the house you inhabit occupies land that was once dense forest also. However nestling a house amongst rainforest like this makes it more likely that the remaining surrounding vegetation is left untouched as garden/land.
      Was it seeing the sheer quantity of remaining untouched vegetation that made you so upset and lapse into this psuedo-ecological rhetoric? Why not go and leave comments on pictures of MacDonald’s homogenous cattle ranches that take up vast swathes of Brazil’s rainforests instead?

  3. Phil

    Brazil is not taking down the forest for someone to live. There are almost no one living on Amazonia rainforest area. The cities in brazil are on the cost and the biggest ones are São Paulo and Rio, and they are as far from Amazonia as New York is from Austin Texas. And on this places there are almost no forest left, as in Europe ore USA.
    The forest are in danger now due to agriculture, and logging. And most of this wood are illegally exported to US and Japan, were they reach better prices than in Brazil.
    So think better when you buy wood products, and when you go to supermarket, if houses like this are really the real problem.

  4. Janka

    I love it, it’s amazing feeling to be part of nature, you feel yourself conected not excluded when you are living in the city. Perfect place for contemplation.

  5. marcio almeida

    Casas como mostrado aqui, até mesmo podem proteger o que resta de florestas no entôrno das cidades.

    Google Translate: “Houses as shown here, can even protect what remains of forests in the surrounding cities.”

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